Orange team moves to Byng Street

Orange team moves to Byng Street

Lives Lived Well’s Orange-based team showed off their new office at 86 Byng St today on 16 December 2021, inviting stakeholders to come and see the new digs.

Our NSW admin and Outreach teams are now located at Byng St after moving from 91 Dalton St in November.

The stakeholder open day was a success, with many people dropping by to have a chat about services and staying for a sausage sandwich. Information packs about Lives Lived Well were handed out and people were able to have a tour of the new space.

A big thankyou to local businesses that donated items for the day, including the IGA and Woodward Street Butchery.

For all media enquiries please contact:

Lives Lived Well Marketing team by emailing [email protected] or phone 1300 727 957.

Nana Muru celebrates turning one

Nana Muru celebrates turning one

On 8 December Lives Lived Well’s Nana Muru team in Nowra celebrated the service’s first birthday with members of the local community.

They had much to celebrate given their achievements during the challenges of COVID-19 lockdowns. In their first year, the dedicated team managed to build strong connections across the Bay and Basin and deliver over 750 episodes of support. Supports include a mobile detox service as well as a Day Program, outreach and aftercare.

We thank the Federal Member for Gilmore, Fiona Phillips, as well as staff from COORDINARE and local support agencies for joining us to celebrate.

For all media enquiries please contact:

Lives Lived Well Marketing team by emailing [email protected] or phone 1300 727 957.

First clients arrive at new Rockhampton service

First clients arrive at new Rockhampton service

On 6 December, Lives Lived Well welcomed our first clients into our new purpose-built residential rehabilitation service in Rockhampton.

The new service, funded by the Queensland Government, has been two years in the planning and construction and is the first of its kind for Central Queensland.

The centre is located at 12 Nuttall Street, Parkhurst (near the Music Bowl). With 42 beds, recreational facilities and extensive grounds, it provides a supportive, safe, drug, alcohol and smoke-free environment to springboard changes for those adversely impacted by their use of alcohol and/or drugs.

Queensland Health is funding Lives Lived Well to deliver drug and alcohol treatment services including:

  • residential rehabilitation – 32 beds (adult single rooms)
  • residential withdrawal treatment unit (8 beds for adults)
  • family residential rehabilitation (2 three-bedroom family units)

The new centre is an addition to Lives Lived Well’s existing adult and youth services in Rockhampton, Gladstone, Emerald, Mackay and the Whitsundays. This new service provides more access and choice – meeting the diverse needs of people in the region who are wanting to address their use of alcohol or drugs.

Tackling Tobacco at Wyla, NSW

Tackling Tobacco at Wyla, NSW

Lives Lived Well’s residential withdrawal and rehabilitation service, Wyla has joined the Cancer Council’s Tackling Tobacco program, enabling us to boost the supports we can offer our clients to quit smoking, in turn helping them to make lasting changes to their alcohol and other drug use.

The Tackling Tobacco program provides organisations with grants to build resources and staff capacity around quitting smoking. It also gives clients access to ongoing support beyond their AOD treatment program.

Around 80% of Wyla’s clients are smokers when they enter treatment. Currently Lives Lived Well pays for clients in the withdrawal unit to use NRT patches. By joining the Tackling Tobacco program, Wyla’s rehabilitation clients will be able to access subsidised NRT. Clients will have the choice of a nicotine inhaler or gum at greatly reduced prices.

The Tackling Tobacco program also gives Lives Lived Well’s Wyla staff access to four modules of online or face-to-face training covering topics such as understanding tobacco dependency, brief interventions and treatments. All Wyla staff will complete the training in the new year.

Post treatment, our clients will have access to the Cancer Council’s I Can Quit support line as well as the resources available through this service.

Our team is excited to do this training in 2022 and looks forward to offering subsidised NRT in support of our clients. The research tells us clients who can stop smoking are also likely to be more successful in reducing or ending their use of alcohol and other drugs.

Lives Lived Well is one of seven organisations in NSW to join the program in 2022.

Meet Shanty Creek’s Uncle Willie

Meet Shanty Creek’s Uncle Willie

Knowing your family story and having cultural knowledge are important parts of the recovery journey for our clients. Lives Lived Well’s Shanty Creek clients are fortunate to have Uncle Willie Clark close at hand to inspire them to build their cultural knowledge.

Uncle Willie Clark joined Shanty Creek residential service four years ago as a Support Worker, bringing with him a lifetime of skills and a deep understanding of his mob’s ways.

Willie is a proud Gunggandji man who grew up in Yarrabah, east of Cairns. His great great grandfather was a Scotsman, in charge of a pearling lugger in the Torres Strait, while his great great grandmother’s mob comes from Lockhart River on Cape York.

Willie describes himself as a ‘jack of all trades’. Some of the jobs he has held include as a Justice Coordinator at Lockhart River, an Operational Officer for QLD Health, a Community Police Officer at Yarrabah, an interpreter for the Magistrates Court, plumbing, working in road and bridge gangs, and hauling sugar cane carts.

These days, Willie’s role as a Support Worker sees him welcoming new clients to Shanty Creek, helping them to settle in, catching up with them to see how their treatment is going, and talking about traditional ways.

“I like taking our residents on cultural trips, whether it’s down to the beach or to the rainforest,” Uncle Willie said. “I talk to clients about the different trees and how they provide medicine or materials for tools such as spears, boomerangs, nulla-nulla and shields.

“If we are down on the beach or at a saltwater creek there are lots of trees and bush food we can use or eat.

“Sometimes I will have an activity about who you are, not by name but who you really are – like your totem name if you have one and what meaning it stands for, your clan group, your cultural respect and lore, healing water, women’s places and bora grounds.

“If a client doesn’t know much about their mob, I will tell them to go and Google it up. Then they start discovering all sorts of things about their family and their clan and I see the joy it brings them. It’s a wonderful thing.”

In his spare time, Uncle Willie enjoys teaching his great grandchildren how to catch prawns and crabs using traditional hunting methods. With five children, 18 grandchildren and 19 great grandchildren, Uncle Willie is kept very busy passing on his traditional knowledge to his own family. We are lucky to have him do this for our Shanty Creek clients as well!